Final 12-month Analysis from the Observational AQUARiUS Study

Impact of Abiraterone Acetate plus Prednisone or Enzalutamide on Patient-reported Outcomes in Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: Final 12-month Analysis from the Observational AQUARiUS Study

24 October 2019

The study looked at patient reported outcomes (PROs) with the impact of different drugs, abiraterone acetate plus prednisone and enzalutamide, on prostate cancer patients. Overall, 226 patients were examined for eligibility and 211 (ITT population) were included.

The overall median completion rate for the 12-month period was 81% for patients still in the study (this rate was based on all 28 PRO questions and all periods, and for both treatments).  Results found that patients experienced less fatigue and cognitive impairments (including memory loss, reduced thinking abilities) with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone than with enzalutamide.

Dr Alison Reid, UK Principal Investigator on the Aquarius study, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust said:

“Traditionally, clinical trials of novel cancer therapies capture physical side effects that occur. As more drugs impact the treatment landscape for patients, information regarding the patient experience on these treatments is needed. 

While pre-existing medical conditions/ medications might mandate choosing either abiraterone acetate or enzalutamide over the other, frequently patients have a choice between the two drugs.

The Aquarius trial gathered patient reported information prospectively in a real-world setting about what it was like for patients to take these medications. It demonstrated that patients experienced less fatigue and cognitive impairments (including memory loss, reduced thinking abilities) with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone than with enzalutamide. 

This is important information that may inform the decision-making of patients and doctors about which of these drugs to select. Future trials should endeavour to incorporate similar assessments.”

Dr Reid’s work is supported by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and The Institute of Cancer Research, London.

To read the full study CLICK HERE